Tenfold increase in childhood and adolescent obesity in four decades, new study finds
October 10, 2017
adolescent
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The number of obese children and adolescents (aged 5 to 19 years) worldwide has risen tenfold in the past four decades, according to a new study led by Imperial College London and the World Health Organization (WHO). If current trends continue, more children and adolescents will be obese than moderately or severely underweight by 2022.
The study is published in The Lancet ahead of World Obesity Day (11 October). It analyzed weight and height measurements from nearly 130 million people aged over five (31.5 million people aged 5 to 19, and 97.4 million aged 20 and older), the largest number of participants ever involved in an epidemiological study. More than 1000 researchers contributed to the study, which looked at body mass index (BMI) and how obesity has changed worldwide from 1975 to 2016.
During this period, obesity rates in the world’s children and adolescents increased from less than 1% (equivalent to five million girls and six million boys) in 1975 to nearly 6% in girls (50 million) and nearly 8% in boys (74 million) in 2016. Combined, the number of obese 5 to 19 year olds rose more than tenfold globally, from 11 million in 1975 to 124 million in 2016. An additional 213 million were overweight in 2016 but fell below the threshold for obesity.
Lead author Professor Majid Ezzati, of Imperial’s School of Public Health, said: “Over the past four decades, obesity rates in children and adolescents have soared globally, and continue to do so in low- and middle-income countries. More recently, they have plateaued in higher income countries, although obesity levels remain unacceptably high.”
Professor Ezzati adds: “These worrying trends reflect the impact of food marketing and policies across the globe, with healthy nutritious foods too expensive for poor families and communities. The trend predicts a generation of children and adolescents growing up obese and also malnourished. We need ways to make healthy, nutritious food more available at home and school, especially in poor families and communities, and regulations and taxes to protect children from unhealthy foods.”
More obese than underweight 5 to 19 year olds by 2022
The authors say that if post-2000 trends continue, global levels of child and adolescent obesity will surpass those for moderately and severely underweight for the same age group by 2022.

Nevertheless, the large number of moderately or severely underweight children and adolescents in 2016 (75 million girls and 117 boys) still represents a major public health challenge, especially in the poorest parts of the world. This reflects the threat posed by malnutrition in all its forms, with there being underweight and overweight young people living in the same communities.
Children and adolescents have rapidly transitioned from mostly underweight to mostly overweight in many middle-income countries, including in East Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean. The authors say this could reflect an increase in the consumption of energy-dense foods, especially highly processed carbohydrates, which lead to weight gain and poor lifelong health outcomes.
Dr. Fiona Bull, programme coordinator for surveillance and population-based prevention of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) at WHO, said: “These data highlight, remind and reinforce that overweight and obesity is a global health crisis today, and threatens to worsen in coming years unless we start taking drastic action.”
Global data for obesity and underweight
In 2016, there were 50 million obese girls and 74 million obese boys in the world, while the global number of moderately or severely underweight girls and boys was 75 million and 117 million respectively.
The number of obese adults increased from 100 million in 1975 (69 million women, 31 million men) to 671 million in 2016 (390 million women, 281 million men). Another 1.3 billion adults were overweight, but fell below the threshold for obesity.
Regional/Country data for obesity, BMI and underweight
Obesity:
The rise in childhood and adolescent obesity in low- and middle-income countries, especially in Asia, has accelerated since 1975. Conversely, the rise in high income countries has slowed and plateaued.
The largest increase in the number of obese children and adolescents was seen in East Asia, the high-income English-speaking region (USA, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Ireland and the UK), and the Middle East and North Africa.
In 2016, obesity rates were highest overall in Polynesia and Micronesia, at 25.4% in girls and 22.4% in boys, followed by the high-income English-speaking region. Nauru had the highest prevalence of obesity for girls (33.4%), and Cook Islands had the highest for boys (33.3%).
In Europe, girls in Malta and boys in Greece had the highest obesity rates, at 11.3% and 16.7% of the population respectively. Girls and boys in Moldova had the lowest obesity rates, at 3.2% and 5% of the population respectively.
Girls in the UK had the 73rd highest obesity rate in the world (6th in Europe), and boys in the UK had the 84th highest obesity in the world (18th in Europe).
Girls in the USA had the 15th highest obesity rate in the world, and boys had the 12th highest obesity in the world.
Among high-income countries, the USA had the highest obesity rates for girls and boys.
BMI:
The largest rise in BMI of children and adolescents since 1975 was in Polynesia and Micronesia for both sexes, and in central Latin America for girls. The smallest rise in the BMI of children and adolescents during the four decades covered by the study was seen in Eastern Europe.
The country with the biggest rise in BMI for girls was Samoa, which rose by 5.6 kg/m2, and for boys was the Cook Islands, which rose by 4.4 kg/m2.
Underweight:
India had the highest prevalence of moderately and severely underweight under-19s throughout these four decades (24.4% of girls and 39.3% of boys were moderately or severely underweight in 1975, and 22.7% and 30.7% in 2016). 97 million of the world’s moderately or severely underweight children and adolescents lived in India in 2016.
Solutions exist to reduce child and adolescent obesity
In conjunction with the release of the new obesity estimates, WHO is publishing a summary of the Ending Childhood Obesity (ECHO) Implementation Plan. The plan gives countries clear guidance on effective actions to curb childhood and adolescent obesity. WHO has also released guidelines calling on frontline healthcare workers to actively identify and manage children who are overweight or obese.
Dr. Bull added: “WHO encourages countries to implement efforts to address the environments that today are increasing our children’s chance of obesity. Countries should aim particularly to reduce consumption of cheap, ultra-processed, calorie dense, nutrient poor foods. They should also reduce the time children spend on screen-based and sedentary leisure activities by promoting greater participation in physical activity through active recreation and sports.”
Dr. Sophie Hawkesworth, from the Population Health team at Wellcome Trust, which co-funded the study, said: “Global population studies on this scale are hugely important in understanding and addressing modern health challenges. This study harnessed the power of big data to highlight worrying trends of both continuing high numbers of underweight children and teenagers and a concurrent stark rise in childhood obesity. Together with global health partners and the international research community, Wellcome is working to help identify new research opportunities that could help better understand all aspects of malnutrition and the long-term health consequences.”
Explore further: Study finds one in five teenage French girls too thin
More information: The Lancet (2017). DOI: 10.1016/S0140-6736(17)32129-3 , http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(17)32129-3/fulltext?elsca1=tlpr
Journal reference: The Lancet
Provided by: Imperial College London

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Incredible Nutritional benefits of Green Peas – a Healthiest Food
Health Benefits of Green Peas

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Health Benefits of Green Peas
Green Peas

Weight Management
Peas are low-fat but high-everything-else. A cup of peas has less than 100 calories but lots of protein, fiber, and micronutrients.

Control Diabetes
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Prevalence of Obesity Among Adults and Youth: United States, 2015–2016
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Key findings
What was the prevalence of obesity in adults in 2015–2016?
Were there differences in the prevalence of obesity among adults by race and Hispanic origin in 2015–2016?
What was the prevalence of obesity among youth aged 2–19 years in 2015–2016?
Were there differences in the prevalence of obesity among youth aged 2–19 years by race and Hispanic origin in 2015–2016?
What are the trends in adult and childhood obesity?
Summary
Definition
Data source and methods
About the authors
References
Suggested citation
NCHS Data Brief No. 288, October 2017

PDF Version (589 KB)

Craig M. Hales, M.D., Margaret D. Carroll, M.S.P.H., Cheryl D. Fryer, M.S.P.H., and Cynthia L. Ogden, Ph.D.

Key findings

Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

In 2015–2016, the prevalence of obesity was 39.8% in adults and 18.5% in youth.
The prevalence of obesity was higher among middle-aged adults (42.8%) than among younger adults (35.7%).
The prevalence of obesity was higher among youth aged 6–11 years (18.4%) and adolescents aged 12–19 years (20.6%) compared with children aged 2–5 years (13.9%).
The overall prevalence of obesity was higher among non-Hispanic black and Hispanic adults than among non-Hispanic white and non-Hispanic Asian adults. The same pattern was seen among youth.
The observed change in prevalence between 2013–2014 and 2015–2016 was not significant among both adults and youth.
Obesity is associated with serious health risks (1). Monitoring obesity prevalence is relevant for public health programs that focus on reducing or preventing obesity. Between 2003–2004 and 2013–2014, there were no significant changes in childhood obesity prevalence, but adults showed an increasing trend (2). This report provides the most recent national estimates from 2015–2016 on obesity prevalence by sex, age, and race and Hispanic origin, and overall estimates from 1999–2000 through 2015–2016.

Keyword: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

What was the prevalence of obesity in adults in 2015–2016?

The prevalence of obesity among U.S. adults was 39.8% (crude). Overall, the prevalence among adults aged 40–59 (42.8%) was higher than among adults aged 20–39 (35.7%). No significant difference in prevalence was seen between adults aged 60 and over (41.0%) and younger age groups (Figure 1).

Among both men and women, the prevalence of obesity followed a similar pattern by age. Men aged 40–59 (40.8%) had a higher prevalence of obesity than men aged 20–39 (34.8%). Women aged 40–59 (44.7%) had a higher prevalence of obesity than women aged 20–39 (36.5%). For both men and women, the prevalence of obesity among those aged 60 and over was not significantly different from the prevalence among those aged 20–39 or 40–59.

There was no significant difference in the prevalence of obesity between men and women overall or by age group.

Figure 1. Prevalence of obesity among adults aged 20 and over, by sex and age: United States, 2015–2016
Figure 1 shows the prevalence of obesity among adults aged 20 and over, by sex and age in the United States from 2015 through 2016.

1Significantly different from those aged 20–39.
NOTES: Estimates for adults aged 20 and over were age adjusted by the direct method to the 2000 U.S. census population using the age groups 20–39, 40–59, and 60 and over. Crude estimates are 39.8% for total, 38.0% for men, and 41.5% for women. Access data table for Figure 1.
SOURCE: NCHS, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2015–2016.

Were there differences in the prevalence of obesity among adults by race and Hispanic origin in 2015–2016?

The prevalence of obesity was lower among non-Hispanic Asian adults (12.7%) compared with all other race and Hispanic-origin groups. Hispanic (47.0%) and non-Hispanic black (46.8%) adults had a higher prevalence of obesity than non-Hispanic white adults (37.9%). The pattern among women was similar to the pattern in the overall adult population. The prevalence of obesity was 38.0% in non-Hispanic white, 54.8% in non-Hispanic black, 14.8% in non-Hispanic Asian, and 50.6% in Hispanic women. Among men, the prevalence of obesity was lower in non-Hispanic Asian adults (10.1%) compared with non-Hispanic white (37.9%), non-Hispanic black (36.9%), and Hispanic (43.1%) men. Non-Hispanic black men had a lower prevalence of obesity than Hispanic men, but there was no significant difference between non-Hispanic black and non-Hispanic white men (Figure 2).

Among non-Hispanic black, non-Hispanic Asian, and Hispanic adults, women had a higher prevalence of obesity than men. There was no significant difference in prevalence between non-Hispanic white men and women.

Figure 2. Age-adjusted prevalence of obesity among adults aged 20 and over, by sex and race and Hispanic origin: United States, 2015–2016
Figure 2 shows the age-adjusted prevalence of obesity among adults aged 20 and over, by sex and race and Hispanic origin in the United States from 2015 through 2016.

1Significantly different from non-Hispanic Asian persons.
2Significantly different from non-Hispanic white persons.
3Significantly different from Hispanic persons.
4Significantly different from women of same race and Hispanic origin.
NOTES: All estimates are age adjusted by the direct method to the 2000 U.S. census population using the age groups 20–39, 40–59, and 60 and over. Access data table for Figure 2.
SOURCE: NCHS, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2015–2016.

What was the prevalence of obesity among youth aged 2–19 years in 2015–2016?

The prevalence of obesity among U.S. youth was 18.5% in 2015–2016. Overall, the prevalence of obesity among adolescents (12–19 years) (20.6%) and school-aged children (6–11 years) (18.4%) was higher than among preschool-aged children (2–5 years) (13.9%). School-aged boys (20.4%) had a higher prevalence of obesity than preschool-aged boys (14.3%). Adolescent girls (20.9%) had a higher prevalence of obesity than preschool-aged girls (13.5%) (Figure 3).

There was no significant difference in the prevalence of obesity between boys and girls overall or by age group.

Figure 3. Prevalence of obesity among youth aged 2–19 years, by sex and age: United States, 2015–2016
Figure 3 shows the prevalence of obesity among youth aged 2 through 19 years, by sex and age in the United States from 2015 through 2016.

1Significantly different from those aged 2–5 years.
NOTE: Access data table for Figure 3.
SOURCE: NCHS, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2015–2016.

Were there differences in the prevalence of obesity among youth aged 2–19 years by race and Hispanic origin in 2015–2016?

The prevalence of obesity among non-Hispanic black (22.0%) and Hispanic (25.8%) youth was higher than among both non-Hispanic white (14.1%) and non-Hispanic Asian (11.0%) youth. There were no significant differences in the prevalence of obesity between non-Hispanic white and non-Hispanic Asian youth or between non-Hispanic black and Hispanic youth. The pattern among girls was similar to the pattern in all youth. The prevalence of obesity was 25.1% in non-Hispanic black, 23.6% in Hispanic, 13.5% in non-Hispanic white, and 10.1% in non-Hispanic Asian girls. The pattern among boys was similar to the pattern in all youth, except Hispanic boys (28.0%) had a higher prevalence of obesity than non-Hispanic black boys (19.0%) (Figure 4).

There were no significant differences in the prevalence of obesity between boys and girls by race and Hispanic origin.

Figure 4. Prevalence of obesity among youth aged 2–19 years, by sex and race and Hispanic origin: United States, 2015–2016
Figure 4 shows the prevalence of obesity among youth aged 2 through 19 years, by sex and race and Hispanic origin in the United States from 2015 through 2016.

1Significantly different from non-Hispanic Asian persons.
2Significantly different from non-Hispanic white persons.
3Significantly different from non-Hispanic black persons.
NOTE: Access data table for Figure 4.
SOURCE: NCHS, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2015–2016.

What are the trends in adult and childhood obesity?

From 1999–2000 through 2015–2016, a significantly increasing trend in obesity was observed in both adults and youth. The observed change in prevalence between 2013–2014 and 2015–2016, however, was not significant among both adults and youth (Figure 5).

Figure 5. Trends in obesity prevalence among adults aged 20 and over (age adjusted) and youth aged 2–19 years: United States, 1999–2000 through 2015–2016
Figure 5 shows trends in obesity prevalence among adults aged 20 and over (age adjusted) and youth aged 2 through 19 years in the United States from 1999 through 2000 through 2015 through 2016.

1Significant increasing linear trend from 1999–2000 through 2015–2016.
NOTES: All estimates for adults are age adjusted by the direct method to the 2000 U.S. census population using the age groups 20–39, 40–59, and 60 and over. Access data table for Figure 5.
SOURCE: NCHS, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 1999–2016.

Summary

The prevalence of obesity was 39.8% among adults and 18.5% among youth in the United States in 2015–2016. The prevalence of obesity was higher among adults aged 40–59 than among adults aged 20–39 overall and in both men and women. Among youth, the prevalence of obesity among those aged 2–5 years was lower compared with older children, and this pattern was seen in both boys and girls.

Women had a higher prevalence of obesity than men among non-Hispanic black, non-Hispanic Asian, and Hispanic adults, but not among non-Hispanic white adults. Among youth, there was no significant difference in obesity prevalence between boys and girls of the same race and Hispanic origin.

Overall, non-Hispanic black and Hispanic adults and youth had a higher prevalence of obesity compared with other race and Hispanic-origin groups. Obesity prevalence was lower among non-Hispanic Asian men and women compared with other race and Hispanic-origin groups. Among men, obesity prevalence was similar between non-Hispanic black and non-Hispanic white men, but obesity prevalence was higher among Hispanic men compared with non-Hispanic black men. For women, obesity prevalence was similar among non-Hispanic black and Hispanic women, and both groups had a higher prevalence of obesity than non-Hispanic white women. Among youth, obesity prevalence among non-Hispanic black and Hispanic youth was higher than both non-Hispanic white and non-Hispanic Asian youth. This pattern was similar among boys and girls, except Hispanic boys had a higher obesity prevalence than non-Hispanic black boys.

Obesity prevalence increased in both adults and youth during the 18 years between 1999–2000 and 2015–2016. Previous analyses showed no change in prevalence among youth between 2003–2004 and 2013–2014 (2). In addition, the observed increase in prevalence between 2013–2014 and 2015–2016 was not significant among youth or adults.

Obesity is defined using cut points of body mass index (BMI). BMI does not measure body fat directly, and the relationship between BMI and body fat varies by sex, age, and race and Hispanic origin (3,4). Morbidity and mortality risk may vary between different race and Hispanic-origin groups at the same BMI. Among some Asian subgroups, risk may begin to increase at a lower BMI compared with other race and Hispanic-origin groups, although study results have varied (5,6).

The definition of obesity is based on BMI for both youth and adults, but the definitions are not directly comparable. Among adults, there is a set cut point based on health risk, while among children, the definition is statistical and is based on a comparison to a reference population (7).

The prevalence of obesity in the United States remains higher than the Healthy People 2020 goals of 14.5% among youth and 30.5% among adults (8).

Definition

Obesity: BMI was calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared, rounded to one decimal place. Obesity in adults was defined as a BMI of greater than or equal to 30. Obesity in youth was defined as a BMI of greater than or equal to the age- and sex-specific 95th percentile of the 2000 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention growth charts (7).

Data source and methods

Data from nine 2-year cycles of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES) (1999–2000, 2001–2002, 2003–2004, 2005–2006, 2007–2008, 2009–2010, 2011–2012, 2013–2014, and 2015–2016) were used for these analyses. Data from NHANES 2015–2016 were used to test differences between subgroups. This 2-year NHANES survey cycle provides the most recent estimates of obesity. However, the precision of the estimated prevalence of obesity and the ability to detect differences in the prevalence when a difference does exist are lower than when estimates are based on 4 years of data because of the smaller sample sizes. In testing for trends in obesity, orthogonal contrasts were used with the nine 2-year cycles.

NHANES is a cross-sectional survey designed to monitor the health and nutritional status of the civilian non institutionalized U.S. population (9). The survey consists of interviews conducted in participants’ homes and standardized physical examinations, including measured height and weight, in mobile examination centers.

The NHANES sample is selected through a complex, multistage probability design. Starting in 2011, non-Hispanic black, non-Hispanic Asian, and Hispanic persons, among other groups, were oversampled to obtain reliable estimates for these population subgroups. Race- and Hispanic origin-specific estimates reflect individuals reporting only one race; those reporting more than one race are included in the total but are not reported separately.

Examination sample weights, which account for the differential probabilities of selection, nonresponse, and non coverage, were incorporated into the estimation process. All variance estimates accounted for the complex survey design by using Taylor series linearization. Pregnant females were excluded from analyses.

Prevalence estimates for the adult population aged 20 and over were age adjusted using the direct method to the 2000 projected U.S. census population using the age groups 20–39, 40–59, and 60 and over. Differences between groups were tested using a univariate t statistic at the p < 0.05 significance level. All differences reported are statistically significant unless otherwise indicated. Adjustments were not made for multiple comparisons. Data management and statistical analyses were conducted using SAS System for Windows version 9.4 (SAS Institute, Inc., Cary, N.C.), SUDAAN version 11.0 (RTI International, Research Triangle Park, N.C.), and R version 3.4.1 (R Foundation for Statistical Computing, Vienna, Austria), including the R survey package (10) to account for the complex sample design.

About the authors

Craig M. Hales, Margaret D. Carroll, Cheryl D. Fryer, and Cynthia L. Ogden are with the National Center for Health Statistics, Division of Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys.

References

National Institutes of Health. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. Clinical guidelines on the identification, evaluation, and treatment of overweight and obesity in adults—The evidence report. Obese Res 6(Suppl 2):51S–209S. 1998.
Ogden CL, Carroll MD, Fryer CD, Flegal KM. Prevalence of obesity among adults and youth: United States, 2011–2014. NCHS data brief, no 219. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics. 2015.
Flegal KM, Ogden CL, Yanovski JA, Freedman DS, Shepherd JA, Graubard BI, Borrud LG. High adiposity and high body mass index-for-age in U.S. children and adolescents overall and by race-ethnic group. Am J Clin Nutr 91(4):1020–6. 2010.
Deurenberg P, Deurenberg-Yap M, Guricci S. Asians are different from Caucasians and from each other in their body mass index/body fat per cent relationship. Obes Rev 3(3):141–6. 2002.
Jafar TH, Islam M, Poulter N, Hatcher J, Schmid CH, Levey AS, Chaturvedi N. Children in South Asia have higher body mass-adjusted blood pressure levels than white children in the United States: A comparative study. Circulation 111(10):1291–7. 2005.
Zheng W, McLerran DF, Rolland B, Zhang X, Inoue M, Matsuo K, et al. Association between body-mass index and risk of death in more than 1 million Asians. N Engl J Med 364(8):719–29. 2011.
Ogden CL, Flegal KM. Changes in terminology for childhood overweight and obesity. National health statistics reports; no 25. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics. 2010.
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. Healthy People 2020 Topics & Objectives: Nutrition and weight status.
Johnson CL, Dohrmann SM, Burt VL, Mohadjer LK. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey: Sample design, 2011–2014. National Center for Health Statistics. Vital Health Stat 2(162). 2014.
Lumley T. Survey: Analysis of complex survey samples. R package (Version 3.32) [computer program]. 2017.

Suggested citation

Hales CM, Carroll MD, Fryar CD, Ogden CL. Prevalence of obesity among adults and youth: United States, 2015–2016. NCHS data brief, no 288. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics. 2017.

Copyright information

All material appearing in this report is in the public domain and may be reproduced or copied without permission; citation as to source, however, is appreciated.

National Center for Health Statistics

Charles J. Rothwell, M.S., M.B.A., Director
Jennifer H. Madans, Ph.D., Associate Director for Science

Division of Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys

Kathryn S. Porter, M.D., M.S., Director
Ryne Paulose-Ram, Ph.D., Associate Director for Science

Eat Squash Vegetable for Better Vision, Skin Health and Immune System

Squash is one of the most versatile and delicious vegetables available throughout the world, and it also packs a serious punch in terms of health and medicinal benefits. Different varieties of squash have the ability to improve the quality of your sight, boost skin health and strengthen the immune system. The seeds of squash are also edible and can be made into a number of different forms or their oils can be extracted. Squash is an umbrella term that includes different vegetables like zucchinis, pumpkins and marrows, etc. Let’s see amazing health benefits of Squash vegetable for better vision, skin and immune system.

The peel of squash also contains many nutrients so it’s better to never peel summer squash. Squash is also very low in calories. Squash is high in vitamins A, C, and niacin while containing useful amounts of folate, potassium. Most squash also contains protein, dietary fiber, calcium, iron, manganese and other vital nutrients.

Health Benefits of Squash

Health Benefits of Squash

 

Benefits of Squash for Better Vision

Summer squash contains high amounts of beta-carotene and lutein. Dietary lutein plays an important role in preventing the onset of cataracts and macular degeneration, which often leads to blindness. A cup of summer squash contains about 135 milligrams of beta-carotene and 2400 micrograms of lutein. Carotenoids found in winter squash also reduce the risk of macular degeneration.

Boosts Immunity

Squash is an important source of many nutrients, including vitamin C, magnesium, and other antioxidant compounds. These vitamins and minerals are important antioxidant components in the body, which help to neutralize free radicals throughout the body. Free radicals are the natural, dangerous byproducts of cellular metabolism, and they have been connected with a wide swath of illnesses, including cancer, heart disease, and premature aging. Furthermore, it contains very high levels of vitamin A, including carotenoid phytonutrients like lutein and zeaxanthin. All of this together helps the body boost its immune response and defend against foreign substances, as well as the free radicals produced by our own body, that may do us harm over the long-term

Benefits of Squash for Maintaining Skin Health and Prevent Aging

A balanced diet greatly helps in providing certain vital nutrients that can keep your skin healthy. Vegetables, in general, are good for skin and squash is one of them. Being rich in vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants, squash is quite beneficial for your skin. Squash is an excellent source of vitamin A. It has beta-carotene that gets converted into vitamin A within the body. Being a powerful antioxidant, vitamin A is required for maintaining proper health and integrity of the skin.

One of the essential benefits of squash includes protection against the damaging effects of sun exposure and preventing dehydration. Moreover, it contains high levels of vitamin C, which fights free radicals within the body, thus preventing signs of aging like fine lines, wrinkles, and pigmentation. Regular consumption of squash keeps your skin hydrated.

Prevent cancer

Squash contains some vitamin C which acts as an antioxidant that can fight cancer. Some studies reported that the juice of squash can prevent the cell from mutation which is triggered by free radicals damage.

Fight inflammation

Inflammation usually happens as result of infection in the body. Squash contains beta-carotene which is known as both powerful antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Eating or consuming squash juice can help you to reduce inflammation.

Prevent diabetes

Carotenoids which presence in squash can help to regulate blood sugar level . so does the fiber that found in squash can also double the effect in lowering blood sugar level. That’s why squash is considered as a healthy snack for diabetes patients.